Рефераты World Museums

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World Museums
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The Museum exhibits works spanning three and a half decades in the artist's life. Viewed in their broader context, they mirror artistic developments in the second half of this century.

On the gallery level the Museum offers a chronological presentation of works from the 1950s, 60s, 70s and 80s. The contrasts between the various rooms-like those in the artist's life-are striking.

In the 1950s Tinquely's works, often executed in black-and-white, possessed a stark, spare quality and were characterized by tremendous clarity. In 1959 his méta-matic drawing machines appeared, marking an important renewal.

1960 was the year of Tinquely's huge international success with his self-destructing Homage to New York. But the artist's style was changing rapidly. He now began working with arc-welded scrap iron, and his sculptures became more provocative and comical.

Following the completion of Eureka for the Expo 64 in Lausanne, his works became more 'sculpture-like' in the classical sense of the word. Works from this period are often all black and are apt to strike the viewer as abstract objects rather than as 'found' ones.

The 1980s were characterized by large-scale projects, among others the large altars. The altar-piece Lola, characteristic of this period, can be seen in the Museum.

The next two rooms contain the monumental work Mengele - Dance of Death, a reflection on the inevitability of death.

In the large hall, monumental sculptures such as Grosse Méta Maxi-Maxi Utopia, Fatamorgana and Agricultural Platform are displayed.

The National Palace Museum

In Taipei is the National Palace Museum, in which is preserved and enormous amount of art and artifact from all of China's 6,000-year history. The National Palace Museum collection was originally the Imperial collection until Chiang liberated it. It was then moved several times until finally the Communists started causing trouble; then the whole thing was shipped to Taiwan. This is probably a good thing, since otherwise it would have been destroyed in the cultural revolution.

The Semitic Museum

The Semitic Museum was founded in 1898, and moved into its present location in 1903. It originally was the home of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, a departmental library, a repository for research collections, a public educational institute, and a center for archaeological exploration. Among the Museum's early achievements are the first scientific excavations in the Holy Land (at Samaria in 1907-1912) and important excavations at Nuzi and the Sinai, where the earliest alphabet was found. During World War II, the Museum was taken over by the Navy and closed to the public.

In the 1970s, it resumed its academic activities, and today is again home to the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations and to the University's collections of Near Eastern archaeological artifacts. These artifacts comprise over 40,000 items, including pottery, cylinder seals, sculpture, coins and cuneiform tablets. Most are from museum-sponsored excavations in Iraq, Jordan, Israel, Egypt, Cyprus, and Tunisia. The Museum is dedicated to the use of these collections for teaching, research and publication of Near Eastern archaeology, history, and culture.

Tareq Rajab Museum

The Museum was built up and run privately by the Rajab family. It was opened to the general public in 1980. The Museum is divided into two main sections of Islamic Art:

SECTION A

This Section deals with calligraphy, pottery, metalwork, glass, wood, ivory and jade carvings of the Islamic world. Early calligraphy is presented in a separate small room, showing pages from the Holy Qur'an, dating back to the first three centuries of the Islamic period

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